Women in Space!

Only 10% of astronauts are female, and in space engineering that number seems even worse. This blog is dedicated to put the Women in Space in the spotlight to educate and inspire a new generation.

Previously known as F Yeah! Female Astronauts.
Recent Tweets @

yurisnight:

Yuri’s Night, Houston, 2014 - Health and Human Performance - University of Houston!

womenrockscience:

Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.
Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.
During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.
With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.
Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”
Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

womenrockscience:

Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.

Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.

During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.

With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.

Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”

Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

(via women-in-science)

womenrockscience:

Rocket Girls: A Five day series into legends of aerospace engineering

(via scientific-women)

n0cturnalnicole:

Even when I was 6 I wanted to go into space. #tbt

humanoidhistory:

Jell-O: An Easter Treat in Space

On May 19, 1996, astronaut Shannon Lucid wrote “a letter home" from the Russian space station Mir, discussing an Easter treat that became a weekly tradition for Lucid and her cosmonaut space-mates:

Here it is, another Sunday on Mir!!! And how, you might ask, do I know that it’s Sunday? Easy!!! I have on my pink socks and Yuri, Yury, and I have just finished sharing a bag of Jell-O!!!

When light follows darkness every 45 minutes, it is important that I have simple ways of marking the passage of time. The pink socks were found on STS-76 and Kevin, the commander, said that they were obviously put on as a surprise for me, so I took them with me over to Mir and decided to wear them on Sundays.

And the Jell-O? It is the greatest improvement in spaceflight since my first flight over 10 years ago. When I found out that there was a refrigerator onboard Mir, I asked the food folks at JSC if they could put Jell-O in a drink bag. Once aboard Mir, we could just add hot water, put the bag in the refrigerator and, later, have a great treat. Well, the food folks did just that and sent a variety of flavors with me to try out. We tried the Jell-O first as a special treat for Easter. It was so great that we decided the Mir-21/ NASA-2 crew tradition would be to share a bag of Jell-O every Sunday night. (Every once in a while, Yuri will come up to me and say, “Isn’t today Sunday?” and I will say “No, it’s not. No Jell-O tonight!!!”)

(NASA)

gurlsinspace:

Rowdy Asteroids: Alessondra Springmann Regional Winner at FameLab LPSC 

spacestamp:

Scott # 1157 Poland August 26, 1963 Valentina Tereshkova

(via fallenfavastros)

colchrishadfield:

Yesterday, I met an astronaut. She looked resolute, visor up, gloves off. Ready for Gravity II.

gurlsinspace:

FameLab Astrobiology 2012 Houston: Britney Schmidt 

fallenfavastros:

spacewatching:

Valentina Tereshkova training for her flight aboard Vostok 6

They wired you to everything in those days..

fallenfavastros:

spacewatching:

Valentina Tereshkova training for her flight aboard Vostok 6

They wired you to everything in those days..