Women in Space!

Only 10% of astronauts are female, and in space engineering that number seems even worse. This blog is dedicated to put the Women in Space in the spotlight to educate and inspire a new generation.

Previously known as F Yeah! Female Astronauts.
Recent Tweets @

humanoidhistory:

Anna Lee Fisher, the first mother in space. Pictured here in 1979 when she was selected by NASA as a candidate for space travel, Fisher is currently the oldest active American astronaut. (NASA/DoD)

(via shuttleisland)

futurist-foresight:

Happy birthday to one of NASA's oldest active astronauts - Anna Fisher.

"Anna Lee Tingle Fisher is an American chemist and a NASA astronaut. Formerly married to fellow astronaut Bill Fisher, and the mother of two children, in 1984 she became the first mother in space. Fisher is the oldest active American astronaut. Wikipedia

aspirethesenses:

Anna Fisher, 1979: The first female astronaut (by: James Vaughan)

spaceexp:

Former Astronaut, USAF Col. Eileen Collins

Source: AGeekMom

usagov:

Image description: On Saturday, the Navy christened a new research ship the “Sally Ride” after the first U.S. woman and youngest person in space. It is the fifth current ship named for an astronaut. 
Photo from the U.S. Navy

usagov:

Image description: On Saturday, the Navy christened a new research ship the “Sally Ride” after the first U.S. woman and youngest person in space. It is the fifth current ship named for an astronaut. 


Photo from the U.S. Navy

(via astro-bitch)

bbglasses:

As Lunar Lion X Prize Team sets up Mission HQ at Penn State University Park, team member Kara Morgan, an aerospace engineering major, painted this awesome mural!

It took her 89 hours over eight days.

More on Penn State’s mission to the moon.

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler

She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”

While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.

She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).

“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:

(via adventuresinchemistry)

womenrockscience:

Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.
Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.
During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.
With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.
Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”
Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

womenrockscience:

Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.

Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.

During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.

With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.

Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”

Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

(via buzzlightyearsu)

82 plays
Nate Dimeo,
The Memory Palace

The Memory Palace - 400,000 stars

Listen to this incredible ode to the first female astronomers and female computers. The first minute, is a (rare) publicity messages, don’t let that stop you though, it is a real treat to the ear

Don’t forget to check out the other episodes of his podcast.

takingbackthestars:

But first, let me take a selfie #unfspacehardware #unfengineering #unf #SWOOPLife